Mather Gallery

 

Student Showcase 2019 Advert

(Now on display through April 2019)

Spring 2019 Student Showcase

CHRISTIAN CALIBOSO
MAX FILIPCHENKO-YEOMANS
CYNTHIA GU
IVA RUZIC

 

This exhibition showcases student art from Matherites, from photography to drawings to wearable designs.

Christian Caliboso:

    Initially Christian focused on capturing his subjects as realistically as possible. As he tried to emulate artists on Instagram, his work expanded to explore human form more generally. How can emotions and feelings manifest themselves in facial features and movements? How can human form be captured by seemingly randomly placed lines? These are some of the central questions Christian’s art grapples with.

Max Filipchenko-Yeomans:

    “Ultimately, family for me is innately tied to everything I do,” Max says when describing their art. Their scanned art conveys the confusion that arises when familial expectations become juxtaposed with everyday desires. The photos are experimental studies of spaces and people, ultimately conveying the complexities of human life. But Max most often deals with the ambiguity of interpretations -- giving the audience as much agency as they need to interpret a piece.

Cynthia Gu:

    Cynthia focuses on putting new perspectives on everyday materials. She prefers to let the material influence her, focusing on the unique properties of a medium to maximize the individuality of her creation. She utilizes mechanical skills to manipulate the materials into a wearable and dynamic design, uniting creativity with technicality. And so under Cynthia’s gaze, recycled food packaging can undergo radical transformations.

Iva Ruzic:

At first glance, Iva’s portfolio is both mesmerizing and diverse. Indeed, their influences vary from Josip Generalić and Frank Benson to Lim Pui Wan and Manabu Himeda. Their plastic piece, which is inspired by the sea, functions as a form of escapism and contemporary embodiment of seapunk and vaporwave. Other pieces explore the human body, playing with the naked and the cartoonish, exploring notions of gender and race.

 

 

Past Exhibits